Countdown to DBS DAY 27 Troublesome Daytime Sleepiness

Countdown to DBS DAY 27 Troublesome Daytime Sleepiness
Yesterday I got on the “SLEEP” soapbox so today is Part 2 of the article from the Parkinson’s Foundation. This information applies to many people so don’t think its only for PWP.
Excessive sleepiness during the day may be a symptom of PD and may even start before the characteristic movement symptoms appear.
Many PD medications can cause sleepiness during the day and may even cause sudden sleepiness with potentially dire consequences, such as falling asleep while driving.
Too much napping during the day makes it hard to sleep through the night.

Therapies
Good sleep is a foundation for good health. Not only does it contribute to tiredness and fatigue, it can also worsen any cognitive issues you are experiencing. If you have trouble sleeping, remember that you don’t have to “just live with it.” Medical therapies can help some sleep difficulties:
A long-acting levodopa medication might prevent PD symptoms from returning during the night. Talk to your doctor about adjusting your PD medications to maximize wakefulness during the day and sleep at night, while controlling your symptoms.
For REM sleep behavior disorder, doctors may prescribe melatonin or clonazepam (Klonopin®), which is a long-acting sedative.
For sleep apnea, wearing a CPAP device (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure device) at night can help prevent obstruction of the airways. You need to have an overnight sleep evaluation for a sleep apnea diagnosis to be made.
Talk to your doctor about over-the-counter sleep aids, such as melatonin, as well as those available with a prescription. It is important to balance the benefits of sleep medications with the risks, especially of daytime sleepiness, cognitive decline and increased falls.
Antidepressants are sometimes prescribed to help nighttime sleep.
If urinary frequency keeps you up at night, be sure your doctor rules out causes other than PD. In addition, there are several medications that can be helpful, including oxybutynin (Ditropan®), tolterodine (Detrol®), trospium (Sanctura®), solifenacin succinate (VESIcare®), darifenacin (Enablex®), mirabegron (Myrbetriq®) and fesoterodine fumarate (Toviaz®). If your doctor has difficulty managing bladder symptoms, you may be referred to a bladder specialist (urologist).
Some physicians prescribe stimulants to help people with PD stay awake during the day.